Comedian Nikki Osborne Challenges the notion that ‘wealth equals wisdom’

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Nikki Osborne has taken a swipe at affluent “boomers,” challenging their widely held belief that accumulating wealth automatically confers wisdom.

In a no-holds-barred column for Qweekend, the millennial Australian comedian, TV presenter, and former model didn’t mince her words as she dissected the patronising advice she often receives from wealthier, older Australians who, in her words, are “clutching at the self-proclaimed title of wise” solely based on their financial status.

Known for her unapologetic humour, Osborne’s Qweekend column opens with the statement: “Yes, you’ve clearly done something right at some point to reach this financial status … but patronising me … isn’t gonna fly … I’m here today to disprove that wealth (equals) wisdom.”

She emphasised her respect for wisdom traditionally associated with philosophers and elders but argued that wealth alone does not guarantee such.

Osborne, 42, shared a personal anecdote that shaped her perspective on advice and success.

The valuable advice she received from an older person at a Grill’d cafe made her realise the importance of creating something of her own rather than relying on others.

Despite her acknowledgment of financial success as a factor in seeking advice, Osborne is quick to debunk the correlation between wealth and wisdom.

She humorously proclaimed, “I am only wise on two topics: sinus care and viral videos. The rest you can raffle.”

Osborne then turned her attention to the so-called “boomers” and their perceived air of infallibility.

In her critique, Osborne playfully takes a jab at the older generation, stating: “Hey, I have a giant, five-bedroom house with a pool, how could I be wrong?! About anything?!”

She addressed the disparity in economic circumstances between generations, highlighting the challenges millennials face in the current housing market.

“Yes, the younger generations have gone soft and a bit weird but when you bought a house, it was only three times your annual salary, whereas now it’s more like 10 times a dual income,” she wrote.

“That’s right, both parents have to work now.”

She sarcastically added: “That’s why we can’t smack our kids, okay?! Because we’re too busy working!”

While cheekily acknowledging their expertise in property values and champagne selection, Osborne questions whether their success qualifies them as life advisers.

Famous personalities, especially those in Hollywood, also faced Osborne’s scrutiny.

Drawing inspiration from Ricky Gervais, she pointed out the detachment from reality that often accompanies success.

Osborne’s scepticism extended to celebrity political posts, labelling many as mere virtue signalling rather than genuine concern or action.

“The more successful one becomes, the more departed from reality one is,” she stated.

“I’m totally up for your opinion on skin care, plastic surgeons and shapewear, but when it comes to wisdom about wars, lockdowns and the environment, I’m not sure you’re exactly reporting from the coal face.”