Morris Bakery appears to close down, South Australian locals devastated

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A popular Aussie bakery that was in business for nearly 80 years appears to have shut its doors for good.

This Monday, unlike every other weekday for the past eight decades, South Australia’s Morris Bakery failed to open to customers.

The shelves of the family-owned business are empty, according to The Adelaide Advertiser, and it has remained closed all week.

Morris Bakery, based in Naracoorte, three hours south of Adelaide along the Limestone Coast, was renowned for its iconic doughnuts, pies, and fresh sandwich bar, first opening in 1946.

At its height, the company stocked its pastries and bread throughout the Limestone Coast and even across the border to Victoria.

Although the business has put out no official announcement of its closure, locals are already lamenting its loss.

“Very sad indeed. Was such a bustling, successful business that was so iconic to our town and districts for many years,” wrote one person on social media.

Another said: “So sad to see another business closing their doors, after such great service to Naracoorte, for so many years. The Morris family can hold their heads high”.

It appears that the bakery had been struggling to survive for some time.

The Advertiser reported that some Naracoorte residents had commented on the fact that the quality of Morris Bakery’s wares had been declining in recent years.

Morris Bakery was also situated on a once-thriving shopping strip that has since been compared to a “ghost town” amid mass closures and empty stores.

On top of that, another bakery had recently opened up on the adjacent street.

The hospitality and retail scene across Australia has been struggling in the wake of the Covid-19 pandemic and then the economic downturn.

Just a day earlier, on Wednesday, news.com.au reported that a popular Sydney nightclub called The Carter had gone into liquidation.

Another iconic South Australian hospitality business, candy maker Smyth’s Confectionery, is being forced to close down later this year after a dispute with the government over a road development.

Late last year, arm of major Victorian catering business, Legacy Hospitality Group, went bust in October with debts in excess of $1.7 million.

National restaurant chain Sushi Bay also collapsed last year, with its last remaining Sydney, Darwin and Canberra branches ordered to shut down, amid allegations that workers had been underpaid $650,000 over a number of years.

In June, controversial restaurant chain Karen’s Diner went into liquidation with $4.3 million worth of debt.